AAFS Continuing Education Needs Identified


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Attendees of the 69th Annual Scientific Meeting in New Orleans, LA, were asked to identify any continuing education needs they would like to see addressed at future meetings. The following list of topics was suggested:

  • Multidisciplinary Sessions (Pathology/Biology and Toxicology, Pathology/Biology and Jurisprudence)
  • Workshop regarding Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS), Abusive Head Trauma (AHT), and alternative diagnoses, including scientific discussions regarding the evaluation of existing literature, both the strengths and shortcomings
  • More on development for “younger” forensic dentists
  • Update on bitemark evidence issues following PCAST report
  • More novel drugs – NPS, XTC analogs, fentanyl analogs
  • Evidence presentation
  • Recognition of staged scenes
  • Toxicologic/Pathologic correlation
  • Identification of poisons not on typical panels – clinical signs/symptoms
  • Ballistics and general firearms for forensic pathologists
  • Shallow water drowning deaths in Pathology/Biology
  • Pediatric trauma vs. natural
  • Abuse of individuals with disabilities and the multidisciplinary team approach
  • Use of K9s in forensic investigations
  • Optimizing LIMS systems for forensic labs
  • Resources for advocating for more money for departments
  • How to set up appropriate internship programs/projects within a working lab to improve outreach to universities
  • New drug updates of importance to Toxicology, Criminalistics, and Pathology/Biology
  • Interpretative case scenarios using small groups and clicker technology (Toxicology)
  • Approach to peri-operative deaths
  • Repeat of photography workshop
  • Forensic pathology histology workshop
  • Basic forensic entomology workshop with updates on latest info
  • Choosing laboratory information systems
  • Aid in dying; dignity in death
  • Abusive head trauma in infants and children
  • More pediatric head trauma and in-custody deaths
  • Critical decision-making as it pertains to decisions on what autopsy procedure is needed
  • How to publish peer-reviewed articles
  • Domestic violence injuries
  • Forensic neuropathology (for non-neuropathologists)
  • Continue to discuss/teach child abuse; mistakes made by forensic pathologists
  • Diagnostic specificity of retinal hemorrhages in childhood head injuries
  • Bitemark research
  • Human abuse/neglect
  • Digital information, security, hacking, discoverability, liability
  • Approach to autopsy of the pregnant woman
  • Cyberpsychology
  • Posterior neck dissection
  • More regarding court issues – Frye, Daubert, Khumo, etc.
  • Molecular autopsy
  • Staffing issues at ME offices in terms of high turnover of forensic pathologists
  • The interface of psychiatry and the other sections, whether that would be for career purposes, etc. (it might be nice to have a career fair component to the meeting because there were so many attendees in their final year(s) of training)
  • Child abuse/neglect
  • Case presentations of medicolegal autopsies (complex)
  • Natural deaths vs. SUID in pediatrics
  • The negative autopsy – unascertained
  • Sudden unexpected natural death
  • More mystery writers (as in past)
  • FORDISC® workshop
  • Forensic epidemiology and public health initiatives
  • Molecular pathology
  • More clarification on bitemarks
  • Odontology case studies
  • Migrant deaths (in addition to missing person deaths, which were touched on)
  • Unusual cases or cases that stand out (science on cases that initially got it wrong)
  • More case studies
  • White collar crime
  • How to impact local, state, national, and international corruption
  • Blunt abdominal injuries in babies and children
  • Elder abuse
  • Interpretation of LC/MS/MS data
  • Recommend workshops either in General or Toxicology sections
  • Basic forensic neuropathology, including histological changes that allow accurate diagnoses
  • A basic review of pediatric pathology in the forensic setting
  • Continuation of workshop for women in forensic science
  • Infant fatalities (SUID investigations)
  • Some basic “101” of each discipline
  • Forensic histopathology
  • Microbiology – pre-mortem versus postmortem organisms
  • Real pathogen vs. artifacts
  • Sessions in which law enforcement, court, scientists, interact/learn from one another
  • ID DNA on pets